Introducing Evolutionary Psychology

February 16, 2016


Introducing Evolutionary

Principles of Evolutionary Psychology

A very short (but incomplete) intro can be found in Evolutionary psychology: A primer

For the most complete introduction to evolutionary psychology, see:

Tooby, J. & Cosmides, L. (1992). In J. Barkow, L. Cosmides, & J. Tooby (Eds.), The adapted mind: Evolutionary psychology and the generation of culture. New York: Oxford University Press.

This paper refers to arguments presented more fully in:

Tooby, J. & Cosmides, L. (1990). Journal of Personality, 58, 17-67.

and

Tooby, J. & Cosmides, L. (1990). Ethology and Sociobiology, 11, 375-424.

For an updated version of the emotion argument in this 1990 paper, see:

Cosmides, L. & Tooby, J. (2000). Evolutionary psychology and the emotions. In M. Lewis & J. M. Haviland-Jones (Eds.), Handbook of Emotions, 2nd Edition. (pp. 91-115.) NY: Guilford. MS here

The 1990 Journal of Personality article above refers to the argument in:

Tooby J. (1982). Journal of Theoretical Biology, 97, 557-576.

To see why motivational adaptations require "innate ideas", see:

Tooby, J., Cosmides, L. & Barrett, H. C. (2005). In Carruthers, P., Laurence, S. & Stich, S. (Eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Content. NY: Oxford University Press.

Cosmides, L. & Tooby, J. (1987). In J. Dupre (Ed.), The latest on the best: Essays on evolution and optimality. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

On why theories of adaptive function are necessary for cognitive psychologists, see:

Cosmides, L. & Tooby, J. (1994). Cognition, 50, 41-77.

For a shorter version of why general purpose learning is insufficient for understanding cultural transmission (including why population genetic models have limitations when imported as models of cultural transmission), see:

Tooby, J. & Cosmides, L. (1989). Evolutionary psychology and the generation of culture, Part I. Theoretical considerations. Ethology & Sociobiology, 10, 29-49.

What is the difference between an adaptationist and a phylogenetic approach? Which is more useful for a psychologist trying to reconstruct the architecture of the human mind? To find out, see:

Tooby, J. & Cosmides, L. (1989). . International Journal of Comparative Psychology, 2, 105-118.

Cosmides, L. & Tooby, J. (1994). Origins of domain-specificity: The evolution of functional organization. In L. Hirschfeld & S. Gelman (Eds.), Mapping the Mind: Domain-specificity in cognition and culture. New York: Cambridge University Press.

For relevance to cognitive neuroscience, see:

Cosmides, L. & Tooby, J. (Section editors). (1995). Section Introduction: Evolutionary approaches to cognitive neuroscience. In M. Gazzaniga (Ed.), The cognitive neurosciences. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Cosmides, L. & Tooby, J. (2000). Introduction. Evolution, Section X (Chapters 80-87). In M. S. Gazzaniga (Ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences, Second Edition. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (pp. 1163-1166.)

Tooby, J. & Cosmides, L. (2000). Toward mapping the evolved functional organization of mind and brain. In M. S. Gazzaniga (Ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences, Second Edition. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (Chapter 80, pp. 1167-1178.)

Cosmides, L. & Tooby, J. (1995). From function to structure: The role of evolutionary biology and computational theories in cognitive neuroscience. In M. Gazzaniga (Ed.), The cognitive neurosciences. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Duchaine, B., Cosmides, L., & Tooby, J. (2001). Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 11(2), 225-230.

Source: www.cep.ucsb.edu

RELATED VIDEO
Human-Quest-PT-3.mpg
Human-Quest-PT-3.mpg
Human-Quest-PT-1-language.mpg
Human-Quest-PT-1-language.mpg
Evolutionary Psychology The Ultimate Origins of Human
Evolutionary Psychology The Ultimate Origins of Human ...
RELATED FACTS
Share this Post

Featured tweets